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[Collection of English broadside ballads].
f PR1181 C62
Collection Overview

Title:

[Collection of English broadside ballads]

Creator/Contributor:

Bates, S. (Sarah), bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Brown, C, bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Dicey, William, bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Norris, Thomas, d. 1732, bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Raikes, Robert, 1690-1757, bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Ward, N., bookseller.

Creator/Contributor:

Wilbraham, George, 1779-1852, former owner.

Creator/Contributor:

D. P, former owner.

Date:

ca. 1720 (issued)

Contents:

[1]. A worthy example of a verteous wife who fed her father with her own milk, he being commanded by the Emperor to be starved to death, and afterwards pardoned. Tune is, flying fame / Printed by T. Norris at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge, and sold by S. Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Gilt-spur-Street. -- [2]. Constance and Anthony, or, An admirable new northern story, of two constant lovers, as I understand, were born near Appleby in Westmoreland ... To the tune of, I would thou wert in Shrewsbury / London: Printed by T. Norris, at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge and sold by S. Bates in Giltspur Street. -- [3]. An excellent ballad of that most dreadful combate fought between Moore of Moore-Hall and the dragon of Wantley. To a pleasant tune much in request / Northampton: Printed by R. Raikes and W. Dicey, and sold by N. Ward in Sun-Lane, Reading ... [et al.] -- [4]. Robin Hood and the beggar, shewing how Robin Hood and the beggar fought, how they changed cloaths, how he went a begging to Nottingham, and how he saved three brethren from hanging, for stealing of the king's dear. To the tune of Robin Hood and the stranger, &c. / London: Printed by Tho. Norris, at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge. -- [5]. A pleasant ballad of King Henry the Second, and the miller of Mansfield, shewing how he was entertained and lodged at the miller's house, and of the pleasant communication. To the tune of The French Levalto, &c. / Printed by T. Norris, at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge and sold by S. Bates, in Giltspur-Street. -- [6]. A Godly warning to all maidens by the example of God's judgments shewed on Jerman's wife of Clifton in county of Nottingham, who lying in child-bed was born awya [sic] and never heard of aftereth. To the tune of The Lady's fall. / Printed by and for T. Norris, at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge and sold by S. Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Giltspur-Street. -- [7]. The Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament, who on his death-bed committed the keeping of his two children, a boy and girl, to his own brother .... To the tune of Rogero, &c. / Printed by R. Raikes and W. Dicey, at Northampton. -- [8]. An excellent ballad of Noble Marquiss and Patient Grissel. To the tune of The Brides good morrow, &c. -- [9]. A lamentable ballad of fair Rosamond, King Henry the Second's concubine, who was put to death by Queen Elinor, in the famous bower of Woodstock, near Oxford. To the tune of Flying fame, &c. / Northamton [sic]: printed by R. Raikes and W. Dic[ey] -- [10]. A lamentable ballad of the lady's fall. To the tune of In Pescod time, &c. / Printed by T. Norris at the Looking-Glass on London-Bridge and sold by S. Bates in Giltspur-Street.
[11]. An excellent ballad of George Barnwell, an apprentice in the City of London, who was undone [by] a strumpet, who caused him thrice to rob his master and to murder his uncle in [Ludlow?] &c. To the tune of The merchant, &c. / London: printed by and for T. Norris, and sold by S. Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Giltspur-Street. -- [12]. The woful [sic] lamentation of Jane Shore, a goldsmith's wife in London .... To the tune of Live with me, &c. -- [13]. An excellent ballad entitul'd The vvandering prince of Troy. To an excellent tune call'd Queen Dido, &c. / Printed by and for T. Norris, at the [Looking-]Glass on London-Bridge and sold [...] at the Sun and Bible in Giltspur-Stre[et]. -- [14]. [A] lamentable ballad of Little Musgrove and Lady Barnet. -- [15]. Cupid's revenge, or An account of a king who slighted all women and at length was constrain'd to marry a beggar, who prov'd a fair and virtuous queen. Tune, I often for my Jenny strove. / For the advantage and convenience of all chapmen, travellers, &c. Dealers with William Dicey, printer at Northampton, this is to give notice that they may be furnish'd by William Royce, in St. Clements, Oxford ... [et al.] with the best sorts of old and new ballads, broadsheets, and histories with finer cuts, much better printed, and cheaper than in any place in England besides. -- [16]. The fryer well-fitted, or A pretty jest that once befel, how a maid put a fryer to cool in the well. To a merry new tune. / London: printed by and for C. Brown, and T. Norris, and sold by T. Norris, on London-Bridge. -- [17]. The fair maid of Dunsmore's lamentation, occasion'd by Lord Wigmore, once Governour of Warwick-Castle, being a full and true relation how he entic'd fair Isabel of Dunsmore, in VVarwickshire, a shepherd's daughter, to his bed, and she perceiving herself with child by him, rather than undergo the disgrace amongst her friends, stabbed herself and died immediately. Tune of, Troy town, &c. / London: Printed by and for [C. Brown and T. Norris ...] -- [18]. Queen Eleanor's confession, shewing how King Henry, with Earl Martial, in fryars habits, come to her instead of two fryars from France which she sent for. -- [19]. Pattern of true love to you I will recite, between a beautiful lady and a courteous knight. To the tune of Dainty come thou to me, &c. / London: printed by and for C. Brown, and a[...] to be sold by C. Bates at the Sun an[d] Bible in Gilt-spur Street. -- [20]. The Spanish lady. Tune of, Flying Fame.

Subject:

II, King of England -- Henry -- 1133-1189 -- Poetry
of Aquitaine, Queen, consort of Henry II, King of England -- Eleanor -- 1122?-1204 -- Poetry
England -- London

Note:

Undated, probable publication date based on printers' and booksellers' dates from Plomer.
Without music; tunes are suggested.
Each broadside measures approx. 28 x 33 cm. or smaller, mounted on 29 cm sheets.
All broadsides, except two, are illustrated with one to three woodcuts.
Printed in four to six columns.
Plomer, H.R. Dictionary of printers and booksellers, 1668-1725.
Armorial bookplate of George Wilbraham; bookplate of DP. CLUW

Type:

Ballads-England-18th century.
Broadside poems-England-18th century.

Physical Description:

print
20 broadsides in 1 bound volume : ill. (woodcuts) ; 29 cm.

Language:

English

Identifier:

f PR1181 C62

Publisher:

England unknown place London] unknown place Northampton, [etc.] : T. Norris ... [et al.]

Related Item:

Plomer, H.R. Dictionary of printers and booksellers, 1668-1725.
Account of a king who slighted all women and at length was constrain'd to marry a beggar
Admirable new northern story
Constance and Anthony, or, An admirable new northern story
Cupid's revenge, or An account of a king who slighted all women and at length was constrain'd to marry a beggar
Excellent ballad entitul'd The wandering prince of Troy
Excellent ballad of George Barnwell
Excellent ballad of Noble Marquiss and Patient Grissel
Excellent ballad of that most dreadful combate fought between Moore of Moore-Hall and the dragon of Wantley
Fair maid of Dunsmore's lamentation
Fryer well-fitted, or A pretty jest that once befel, how a maid put a fryer to cool in the well
Godly warning to all maidens by the example of God's judgments shewed on Jerman's wife of Clifton in county of Nottingham
Lamentable ballad of fair Rosamond
Lamentable ballad of Little Musgrove and Lady Barnet
Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament
Pattern of true love to you I will recite, between a beautiful lady and a courteous knight
Pleasant ballad of King Henry the Second and the miller of Mansfield
Pretty jest that once befel, how a maid put a fryer to cool in the well
Queen Eleanor's confession
Robin Hood and the beggar
Spanish lady
Wandering prince of Troy
Woeful lamentation of Jane Shore
Woful lamentation of Jane Shore
Worthy example of a verteous wife who fed her father with her own milk