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Guide to the Enzo de Chetelat papers Bernath Mss 316
Bernath Mss 316  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Artifacts, an autobiography, correspondence, documents, maps, several thousand photographs (prints, negatives, and slides), reports, travel files, and writings of Enzo de Chetelat, a mining engineer, who visited and worked in numerous countries, often French colonies at the time, from the 1920s to the 1970s.
Background
Enzo de Chetelat was born in Milan, Italy in 1901. He received his degree in geological engineering from the University of Nancy (France) in 1924, and hisdoctorate from the University of Paris. He continued to do research at Columbia and Harvard, and became a U.S. citizen in 1943. He began his career as a mining geologist in 1924 working in French occupied countries such as Morocco, French Guinea, and countries in Southeast Asia. From 1939-1942, he worked for Le Societé de Nickel in New Caledonia. He became employed with the U.S. Board of Economic Warfare, Foreign Economic Administration in 1942 and was in charge of lend-lease operations for the rehabilitation of mines in Northern Africa. In addition, he worked in Martinique, Guadeloupe, Korea, and Tunisia. He started doing consulting in 1961. He lived at Monsey, NY for a time. He married Eleanor Beer, who went to Vassar, and who accompanied him on some of his early assignments abroad.During the late 1970s, he maintained residences in Grand Junction, CO and France. He passed away in France, in 1983.
Extent
16.0 linear feet (10 document boxes, 12 cartons, and 3 oversize boxes)
Restrictions
Copyright has not been assigned to the Department of Special Collections, UCSB. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Department of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which also must be obtained.
Availability
The collection is open for research.